Chinese Society in Transition

Chinese Society in Transition

CHANGING CONTEXTS OF DISSENT

It has been twenty-three years after Tiananmen and China is still suffering. The annual crackdown commemorations of the anniversary in 4th June were underway. This is a commemoration of the demonstrations held by students in 1989 in Tiananmen Square Beijing. The most concerning issue revolves around the number of activists and writers for whom the new normal is “crackdown”. Two cases of high profile status have led to constant intimidation, and constant home surveillance stresses into the nation’s media (Chang, 32). Consequently, new organizations are being founded with an aim of protecting the cultural heritage, as well as the environment. Additionally, traditional reinvigoration has also been overseen through clan or temple associations.

Further social divide

The social and economic transformation in countless parts of China at the time of reforms came swiftly and was far-reaching (Perry and Selden, p 6). However, the remarkable changes were only noticeable in relatively rural areas of the nation. As such, the urban industry proved resistant to such transformations. This was so, following state ownership of major urban factories that sourced out the country’s revenues. The resistance was an indicator of yet another social rift weighing on a country that so much quested for uniformity. Somewhat, the communist and or Leninist aspect of the society proved more of a discriminatory tool than a unifying tool. What followed the urban resistance was increased tension from the countryside. Since the urban side of the nation proved rigid to reform, wide spread labor unrest from villages ensued. No doubt, this affected the national economy, not to mention the quest to achieve commonality, equality and unity in China. The state or those in authority can be so aggressive in advocating for uniformity across China, unfortunately, they are the same political figures that fuel the rift through social