Report on Night by Elie Wiesel

Report on Night by Elie Wiesel

The author was born in 1928 in Sighet, Romania to parents of a Hungarian-Jewish ascent. The book Night is a narration of the author’s experience while in detention in the Nazi concentration camp within duration of two years i.e. 1944 and 1945. The author focuses on the effect of the cruelty subjected to him and fellow Jews on his beliefs regarding God and humanity. Along with this, the book vividly illustrates the Holocaust by giving first hand narrations of the Jewish teenager Eliezer while in detention at Birkenau. Illustrations such as burning of babies, annihilation of “weak Jews” by hanging or firing squads and the inhuman conditions Jewish slaves were forced housed. The book is a sequential story typified with a decline from religious innocence to dark cynicism in Eliezer’s life. The author did not divide the book into distinct sections but three sections emerge where the first is life before explicit fascism followed by initiation of direct fascism in Hungary and last the carrying away of Hungarian Jews to detention.

A conspicuous ideology from the book is the “killing of God” by the cruelty perpetuated against the Jews. The narrator posses the question of how a caring God allows such deeds to be carried out by men against fellow men. This question is particularly focal given the religious devotion as well as background the narrator/author possessed prior to the detention. The literary work Night, can associated with previous readings such as Causes of Prejudice by Vincent N. Parrillo since holocaust is a result of rooted prejudice instilled through race and religion. Additionally, Holocaust as depicted in Night is an intertwining of multiple external prejudicial causes/contributors, a notion Vincent perpetuates.

Night mentions an issue currently imperative to the United Nations, the possibility of having a sovereign Palestine state from present Israel. This is important considering the Jews consoled themselves with the hope of once having a sovereign state. The diabolical incidences witnessed in the holocaust compelled the United Nations Security Council to create the Israel Sovereign nation in 1948. However, this is undermined by creation of a new Palestine nation in the same region. The ability of the book to illustrate explicitly the gloom and darkness characteristic of the holocaust makes it very recommendable to historically oriented readers.